Article

Evaluation of the microbiome composition in particulate matter inside and outside of pig houses

Se-Woon Hong1,2,3, Jinseon Park1, Hanna Jeong1,2, Minseok Kim3,4,*
Author Information & Copyright
1Department of Rural and Biosystems Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 61186, Korea.
2Education and Research Unit for Climate-Smart Reclaimed-Tideland Agriculture, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 61186, Korea.
3AgriBio Institute of Climate Change Management, Chonnam National University , Gwangju 61186, Korea.
4Department of Animal Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Gwangju 61186, Korea.
*Corresponding Author: Minseok Kim, AgriBio Institute of Climate Change Management, Chonnam National University , Gwangju 61186, Korea, Republic of. Department of Animal Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Gwangju 61186, Korea, Republic of. E-mail: mkim2276@gmail.com.

© Copyright 2021 Korean Society of Animal Science and Technology. This is an Open-Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Received: Feb 10, 2021; Revised: Feb 24, 2021; Accepted: Feb 28, 2021

Published Online: Mar 04, 2021

Abstract

Particulate matter (PM) produced in pig houses may contain microbes which can spread by airborne transmission, and PM and microbes in PM adversely affect human and animal health. To investigate the microbiome in PM from pig houses, nine PM samples were collected in summer 2020 inside and outside of pig houses located in Jangseong-gun, Jeollanam-do Province, Korea, comprising three PM samples from within a nursery pig house (I-NPH), three samples from within a finishing pig house (I-FPH), and three samples from outside of the pig houses (O-PH). Microbiomes were analyzed using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. Firmicutes was the most dominant phylum and accounted for 64.8%–97.5% of total sequences in all the samples, followed by Proteobacteria (1.4%–21.8%) and Bacteroidetes (0.3%–13.7%). In total, 31 genera were represented by > 0.3% of all sequences, and only Lactobacillus, Turicibacter, and Aerococcus differed significantly among the three PM sample types. All three genera were more abundant in the I-FPH samples than in the O-PH samples. Alpha diversity indices did not differ significantly among the three PM types, and a principal coordinate analysis suggested that overall microbial communities were similar across PM types. The concentration of PM did not significantly differ among the three PM types, and no significant correlation of PM concentration with the abundance of any potential pathogen was observed. The present study demonstrates that microbial composition in PM inside and outside of pig houses is similar, indicating that most microbe-containing PM inside pig houses leaks to the outside from where it, along with microbe-containing PM on the outside, may re-enter the pig houses. Our results may provide useful insights regarding strategies to mitigate potential risk associated with pig farming PM and pathogens in PM.

Keywords: 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing; Microbiome; Particulate matter; Pathogen; Pig house


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